Cub baserunning stats

I’ve written a software program that combs through game logs and gathers baserunning data. The table below gives baserunning statistics for Cub regulars in games through August, 2008.

The stats are divided into five columns, plus a sixth column for cumulative stats. Here is a description of the five baserunning results being monitored.

1) runner on first, second unoccupied, batter hits a single. Does the runner get to third or does he stop at second?

2) runner on first, batter hits a double. Does the runner reach home or stop at third?

3) runner on second, batter hits a single. Does the runner score or stop at third?

4) runner on third with less than two outs. Does the runner score in the inning?

5) runner on first with none out and no one on second. Does the runner score in the inning?

I discussed #5 when I presented 2007 Cub stats last April:

I especially like number five because it’s where a player’s speed and savvy are the most highly leveraged. A speed player has this insight into one of baseball’s mysterious secrets: if you’re on first with none out, you can score even if the three hitters behind you make outs.

The number columns are given in sets of threes, where the first number indicates success, the second, opportunities, and the third, percent success against opportunities. So for example, column 1 is number of times going from first to third on a single; column 2 is number of times on first when the batter singled; and column 3 is #1 (x100) divided by #2. The final three columns on the right are total successes, total opportunities, and cumulative rate of success.

I will try to follow this up in the next week or two with stats for other NL teams, league leaders, etc.

Cubs 2008 baserunning through August:

1. 1st->3rd on single 2. score from 1st on double 3. score from 2nd on single 4. score from 3rd, < 2 out 5. score from 1st, 0 out 6. totals
Johnson 6 16 38% 4 8 50% 9 11 82% 12 16 75% 18 22 82% 49 73 67%
Theriot 9 18 50% 7 12 58% 15 20 75% 32 41 78% 23 55 42% 86 146 59%
Fontenot 7 13 54% 1 4 25% 6 10 60% 10 11 91% 2 10 20% 26 48 54%
DeRosa 4 21 19% 6 15 40% 10 17 59% 28 29 97% 20 47 43% 68 129 53%
Soriano 4 12 33% 2 4 50% 6 14 43% 23 29 79% 10 28 36% 45 87 52%
Fukudome 5 21 24% 6 8 75% 14 18 78% 12 20 60% 17 38 45% 54 105 51%
Ramirez 5 18 28% 2 11 18% 8 18 44% 25 36 69% 22 43 51% 62 126 49%
Lee 6 29 21% 5 12 42% 8 14 57% 23 30 77% 13 36 36% 55 121 45%
Edmonds 4 11 36% 1 3 33% 3 4 75% 7 13 54% 6 17 35% 21 48 44%
Soto 0 8 0% 5 10 50% 3 9 33% 11 16 69% 6 30 20% 25 73 34%

Looking at the data . . .

We knew that Soto and probably Edmonds were slowpokes, but Derrek Lee has also lost a couple of steps.

Ramirez is not in the bottom group.

DeRosa does more on the bases than I would have thought. His 28 out of 29 runs scored after getting to third with less than two outs is one of two remarkable results in the table. The other is Reed Johnson’s scoring 82 percent of the time–18 runs in 22 chances–after getting on first with nobody out.

Maybe Johnson should be the everyday centerfielder. Doesn’t he do the things that Felix Pie was supposed to do?